Summer 3-Gun On an Injured Ankle, 2012.08.17

THE SETTING

An absolutely gorgeous day to take an afternoon off of work and head to my local range for a little Summer 3-Gun.  Unfortunately I severely sprained my ankle (while shooting) six days ago and am still in a walking boot-type cast.  Lucky for me the stages were not very movement intensive as far as Three-Gun matches go and there were no weapon transitions.  However having to cover about 30 yards of ground on surface that is akin to decorative rock each stage made for some slow times, low rankings and a lot of ankle soreness.  The upside is that I was able to get a bunch of trigger time in and enjoy the camaraderie of some great people.

THE STAGES

The three stages were pretty simple this time with a common obstacle setup for all three and common targets among the rifle and pistol stages.  The Match Director, Walter T., did this to keep things moving during the match and be done in our 2.5 hour window so the Friday night Practical Pistol Match could start on time.  We did fairly well and were able to get all three stages in before the PPM.

Practice to Practical (Shotgun)

I love shotgun stages.  I never was that into the shotgun as a platform until I started shooting Three Gun.  This stage had seven steel pepper poppers, two birds and three plates on the Texas Star.  The course description:

-Start behind rear fault line outside of shooting area with shotgun loaded with safety on in low ready
At signal engage targets as they become visible from within shooting areas. 4 targets on the left must be engaged through the tire.
Time plus scoring. Minimum of 12 birdshot (10 steel and 2 frangible).

Start with eight in the tube and one in the chamber (9).  The smart play here was to whack all four targets on the left through the tire (5) load four as you’re moving to the right (9).  Engage all three poppers (6) and the two flipper birds (4).  Then run hard up to the 16 yard line and engage the three plates on the Texas Star (1).

What I did was start with eight in the tube and one in the chamber (9), nailed all 4 targets on the left (5), limped over to the right side while loading four (9), engaged all three poppers (6) and went up for the birds.  I got one bird (5) but the second one never came and that’s when I realized that I missed the popper on the right.  I reengaged it and got the bird as well (3).  As I was limping up to the Texas Star I went to load another four but was only able to stuff two until I felt some severe binding that stopped me (5).  I got my mount back with the two spare shells in my support hand and engaged the Star, knocking down all three plates in three shots (2).  Why did I load another four when I had enough to neutralize the star?  Well I had to limp instead of run anyway due to my walking boot so I figured that I would give my self a bit of insurance while getting one more practice repetition in for the weak hand reload during competition.

Chip Off the Shoulder (Rifle)

Course description:

-Start behind rear fault line outside of shooting area with rifle loaded with safety on in low ready.
At signal engage targets as they become visible from within shooting areas. 4 targets on the left must be engaged through the tire.
Time plus scoring. Minimum of 12 rifle (10 paper and 2 knock down/ frangible). The 2 little black targets are plastic primer trays. Knock down or any part of bullet hole to score.

The rifle stage was less eventful for me.  I basically cleaned out the targets on the left fairly quickly, limped over to the right, cleaned those out and then engaged the far targets from the barrel on the zero yard line.  I nailed the target stand that was holding the frangible target (primer tray) because I forgot about my height over bore offset.  I have a zero at 50 yards and verified at 200 yards so I should have placed my 4 MOA Aimpoint dot directly over the top of the frangible target.  That little mistake cost me 20 points.  Another little lesson learned there is to pay attention to the scoring as I would have tried a bit harder if I knew they were scored targets instead of “bonus” points.  Oops.

Chip Off the Shoulder (Pistol)

As I said earlier the pistol stage was the same setup as the rifle which was awesome because you could compare your rifle and pistol times to see which you were more proficient at.  The stage description:

-Start behind rear fault line outside of shooting area with pistol loaded in holster hands relaxes at sides.
At signal engage targets as they become visible from within shooting areas. 4 targets on the left must be engaged through the tire.
Time plus scoring. Minimum of 12 pistol (10 paper and 2 knock down/ frangible). The 2 little black targets are plastic primer trays.

The smart play on this one was to run down to the 16 yard line to engage the far targets.  I had to limp down but I was able to knock the right frangible off in one shot.  Unfortunately the left frangible took me three shots.

SHOOTING FOOTAGE

RESULTS

Stage 1:

Stage 2:

Stage 3:

Overall:

LESSONS LEARNED

All the basics were in action during this shoot.  Sight alignment, trigger control and all that jazz.  It seemed it was even more important for me because I took a lot longer to cover any ground that need be covered.  Each shot counted because I couldn’t just run faster to make up for the extra time at an array or a missed target.  That said, there was no way in hell that I could have shot fast enough to make up for how slow I was to get to each array.  One of the things that I like most about Action Shooting and specifically Three-Gun is that they are very athletic sports and require just as much fine motor skill precision as they do brute strength and agility.  Even though I wasn’t competitive this time around the facts remains that any trigger time is good trigger time and competition will always teach you things about your skills and abilities.

Tueller Drill In Action is An Eye Opener – Practical Pistol for Personal Defense


THE TUELLER DRILL

The Tueller Drill is one of those famous drills in self defense, gunfighter and shooting lore.  Basically the premise is that an assailant armed with a knife can cover a 21 foot distance faster than you can draw your pistol to defend yourself.  This study was originally performed by Sergeant Dennis Tueller and published in SWAT Magazine in 1983.  With the rise of concealed carry in America, the Tueller Drill has experienced a resurgence and was even featured on the popular television shows The Best Defense and Myth Busters.

PRACTICAL SHOOTERS IN ACTION

Ben G., the Match Director of the Friday Practical Pistol Match at my local range, built a sled and engineered a simple method to activate the sled with a rope and a runner.  It is pretty interesting to watch this video compilation that I put together.  Even though each of us knows that the sled is coming many of us are startled or hesitate and many guys can’t get a lot of shots off in the time necessary.  It is important to note that this experiment consists of a guy towing a sled behind him and not just running.  In real life the assailant would cover the ground far quicker.  To switch things up in subsequent rounds Ben G. added a second target, a third and then cover while slowing the sled down to a walk or jog.

TAKEAWAYS

Deescalate – If you can, always deescalate the situation. Tell the aggressor anything he wants to hear to get out of the situation.

Cheat The Draw – If you can’t deescalate and things are getting worse, get your hand on your weapon at minimum. If things have gotten very bad, get your weapon out of the holster.

Get Off The “X” – Move! Get out of the way of the aggressor to buy yourself time on the draw.

Find Cover – Place anything you can between you and the aggressor to slow his progress. Cars, light post, trash can, etc. Any fraction of a second counts.

The Other Side – If you are ever caught in an active-killer, mass-shooting in progress and for some reason you don’t have your CCW, you CAN do something about it.  From this drill I’ve learned that rushing a person can catch them off guard and cause them to hesitate even if they are anticipating the attack.