Summer 3-Gun On an Injured Ankle, 2012.08.17

THE SETTING

An absolutely gorgeous day to take an afternoon off of work and head to my local range for a little Summer 3-Gun.  Unfortunately I severely sprained my ankle (while shooting) six days ago and am still in a walking boot-type cast.  Lucky for me the stages were not very movement intensive as far as Three-Gun matches go and there were no weapon transitions.  However having to cover about 30 yards of ground on surface that is akin to decorative rock each stage made for some slow times, low rankings and a lot of ankle soreness.  The upside is that I was able to get a bunch of trigger time in and enjoy the camaraderie of some great people.

THE STAGES

The three stages were pretty simple this time with a common obstacle setup for all three and common targets among the rifle and pistol stages.  The Match Director, Walter T., did this to keep things moving during the match and be done in our 2.5 hour window so the Friday night Practical Pistol Match could start on time.  We did fairly well and were able to get all three stages in before the PPM.

Practice to Practical (Shotgun)

I love shotgun stages.  I never was that into the shotgun as a platform until I started shooting Three Gun.  This stage had seven steel pepper poppers, two birds and three plates on the Texas Star.  The course description:

-Start behind rear fault line outside of shooting area with shotgun loaded with safety on in low ready
At signal engage targets as they become visible from within shooting areas. 4 targets on the left must be engaged through the tire.
Time plus scoring. Minimum of 12 birdshot (10 steel and 2 frangible).

Start with eight in the tube and one in the chamber (9).  The smart play here was to whack all four targets on the left through the tire (5) load four as you’re moving to the right (9).  Engage all three poppers (6) and the two flipper birds (4).  Then run hard up to the 16 yard line and engage the three plates on the Texas Star (1).

What I did was start with eight in the tube and one in the chamber (9), nailed all 4 targets on the left (5), limped over to the right side while loading four (9), engaged all three poppers (6) and went up for the birds.  I got one bird (5) but the second one never came and that’s when I realized that I missed the popper on the right.  I reengaged it and got the bird as well (3).  As I was limping up to the Texas Star I went to load another four but was only able to stuff two until I felt some severe binding that stopped me (5).  I got my mount back with the two spare shells in my support hand and engaged the Star, knocking down all three plates in three shots (2).  Why did I load another four when I had enough to neutralize the star?  Well I had to limp instead of run anyway due to my walking boot so I figured that I would give my self a bit of insurance while getting one more practice repetition in for the weak hand reload during competition.

Chip Off the Shoulder (Rifle)

Course description:

-Start behind rear fault line outside of shooting area with rifle loaded with safety on in low ready.
At signal engage targets as they become visible from within shooting areas. 4 targets on the left must be engaged through the tire.
Time plus scoring. Minimum of 12 rifle (10 paper and 2 knock down/ frangible). The 2 little black targets are plastic primer trays. Knock down or any part of bullet hole to score.

The rifle stage was less eventful for me.  I basically cleaned out the targets on the left fairly quickly, limped over to the right, cleaned those out and then engaged the far targets from the barrel on the zero yard line.  I nailed the target stand that was holding the frangible target (primer tray) because I forgot about my height over bore offset.  I have a zero at 50 yards and verified at 200 yards so I should have placed my 4 MOA Aimpoint dot directly over the top of the frangible target.  That little mistake cost me 20 points.  Another little lesson learned there is to pay attention to the scoring as I would have tried a bit harder if I knew they were scored targets instead of “bonus” points.  Oops.

Chip Off the Shoulder (Pistol)

As I said earlier the pistol stage was the same setup as the rifle which was awesome because you could compare your rifle and pistol times to see which you were more proficient at.  The stage description:

-Start behind rear fault line outside of shooting area with pistol loaded in holster hands relaxes at sides.
At signal engage targets as they become visible from within shooting areas. 4 targets on the left must be engaged through the tire.
Time plus scoring. Minimum of 12 pistol (10 paper and 2 knock down/ frangible). The 2 little black targets are plastic primer trays.

The smart play on this one was to run down to the 16 yard line to engage the far targets.  I had to limp down but I was able to knock the right frangible off in one shot.  Unfortunately the left frangible took me three shots.

SHOOTING FOOTAGE

RESULTS

Stage 1:

Stage 2:

Stage 3:

Overall:

LESSONS LEARNED

All the basics were in action during this shoot.  Sight alignment, trigger control and all that jazz.  It seemed it was even more important for me because I took a lot longer to cover any ground that need be covered.  Each shot counted because I couldn’t just run faster to make up for the extra time at an array or a missed target.  That said, there was no way in hell that I could have shot fast enough to make up for how slow I was to get to each array.  One of the things that I like most about Action Shooting and specifically Three-Gun is that they are very athletic sports and require just as much fine motor skill precision as they do brute strength and agility.  Even though I wasn’t competitive this time around the facts remains that any trigger time is good trigger time and competition will always teach you things about your skills and abilities.

Combat Shotgun Competition at Knob Creek Range (2012.10.14)

Knob Creek Range Shotgun Competition Registration

Knob Creek Range Shotgun Competition Registration

Some shooting buddies and I are heading down to the Knob Creek Range near Louisville, Kentucky in October for their annual fall Machine Gun Shoot. This trip just happens to coincide with our annual “Combat Clays” shoot so we decided that we’d all sign up for the shotgun competition to keep the tradition alive. You see Combat Clays is where our group of friends from three states (sometimes more) converges on the mountains in Colorado to shoot clay pigeons with our combat shotguns during the day and then cook big dinners, drink bourbon and tell tales in the cabin afterward. You can see how a Machine Gun Shoot and combat shotgun match will suit this tradition perfectly.

Knob Creek Range’s web site is pretty tough to navigate and it usually takes me a while to figure out how I got to the Shotgun Match description. Once I’m there I am underwhelmed by information.  One interesting thing is that you have to mail in your application with a check and then they mail you back a confirmation.   This is basically the only information available:

A bonus of five seconds will be deducted from the score of contestants whose equipment meets all of the following conditions. The competition director shall make the decision as to awarding bonuses.

  1. The weapon must conform to the general configuration of production weapons (as opposed to factory custom shops) with only slight modification to sights, barrel length and trigger weight.
  2. Maximum barrel length is 30” on any firearm.
  3. Recoil compensators & porting, such as Magna Port, Keeper or Pro Portis allowed.
  4. Optical sights or dot sights are optional.
  5. No flimsy device of any kind unsuitable for the rigors of duty use shall be allowed.
  6. (Magazine extensions or metallic sights which approximate optional factory equipment will qualify).
  7. No slugs.  Buckshot or Birdshot of any size is allowed.

It looks like they have relaxed their requirements from previous years that mandated a 22″ barrel, no compensator or porting, no optics and minimum #4 Buckshot.

I’ll be shooting my usual 3-Gun load-out that includes a box stock Mossberg JM Pro Series 930 with 22″ barrel and two AP Customs Shotshell Carriers.  With no mention of a round count I better bring too much just in case.  200 rounds should be enough.

Looking forward to this trip!